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Arla and the Food Banks (FEBA) have signed an agreement to donate surplus products

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Arla and the European Federation of Food Banks (FEBA) have signed an agreement to donate surplus products through the FEBA network partners in Europe.

The agreement formalises and builds on the partnerships already in place between Arla and local food bank FEBA members such as Fareshare in the UK, Fødevarebanken in Denmark and the Dutch food bank.

“Arla’s local partners are a great resource competent-wise and are often very active on a national level to influence policy making and communicating about the challenges. The new partnership strengthens our ability to benefit from the large network of food banks around Europe in case there are large surplus volumes to be redistributed, which is not possible for local food banks to absorb,” says Kristian Østerling Eriknauer, vice president of CSR in Arla.

In partnering with the FEBA, a non-profit network organisation which brings together 326 food banks in 23 countries throughout Europe, Arla intends to further increase its provision of food supplies to help support those in need. The move will also help Arla to achieve its goal to reduce food waste by halfby 2020.

Turkiskt besök på Källsjö mejeri

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Mejeriet i Ullared fick långväga besök under tisdagen då turkiska jordbruksministeriet kom för att se hur de jobbar, skriver P4 Halland på webben.

Turkiet vill som bekant så småningom bli en del av EU och jordbruksministeriet ville då komma till Sverige för att se hur småskaliga mejerier och jordbruk jobbar, eftersom de fått höra att svenskt lantbruk kommit långt.

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The WHO is Urging Agribusiness to Stop Using Antibiotics on Healthy Animals

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The World Health Organization urged farmers on Tuesday to stop using antibiotics to promote growth and prevent disease in healthy animals because the practice fuels dangerous drug-resistant superbug infections in people.

Describing a lack of effective antibiotics for humans as “a security threat” on a par with “a sudden and deadly disease outbreak”, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said “strong and sustained action across all sectors” was vital to turn back the tide of resistance and “keep the world safe”.

The WHO “strongly recommends an overall reduction in the use of all classes of medically important antibiotics in food-producing animals, including complete restriction of these antibiotics for growth promotion and disease prevention without diagnosis,” the United Nations agency said in a statement.

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Research: Cow’s Milk Triggers Type 1 Diabetes?

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A report by seven researchers has concluded the milk may trigger type 1 diabetes. The researchers say:

“The evidence for milk and, particularly A1 β-casein, as a primary dietary trigger for type 1 diabetes is intriguing although causation remains unproven. The ecological evidence across populations is particularly strong. Exclusive breastfeeding is widely regarded as being protective against type 1 diabetes in early infancy, but its benefits may be lost if the mother supplements breast milk with cows’ milk formula, or if the duration of breastfeeding is too short. It is also conceivable that some dietary triggers might cross into breast milk. These factors might contribute to the inconsistencies in the reported associations between breastfeeding and type 1 diabetes.”

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Probiotic dairy products for children: An untapped market with global appeal

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Chr. Hansen launches culture solution for kids’ drinking yogurt with the probiotic strain L. rhamnosus, LGG®

The market for children’s products is increasing rapidly with the trend towards smaller families, combined with higher disposable incomes, and parents are looking for foods that are healthy as well as tasty and convenient. At the same time, the awareness of probiotics – good bacteria – is increasing, as more and more scientific data on the correlation between digestive health and overall health is published, creating new opportunities for the innovative dairy producer.

Now Chr. Hansen presents ProKids, a concept solution for a tasty probiotic children’s drinking yogurt. It is Chr. Hansen’s newly developed freeze-dried DVS® culture, nu-trish® GY-1, which contains the LGG® probiotic strain together with a compatible yogurt culture, and a proven recipe that make up the backbone of the ProKids concept.

EU blåstempler danskernes favorit-ost

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Den klassiske Danbo-ost er tildelt Beskyttet Geografisk Betegnelse (BGB) af EU-Kommissionen, skriver mejeri.dk. Fremover må osten kun fremstilles i Danmark efter ganske bestemte kvalitetskriterier.

Dermed kommer Danboen i selskab med oste som italienske Parmigiano Reggiano, franske Emmental de Savoie og danske Danablu og en lang række andre europæiske oste, der er beskyttet af EU under mærkerne BGB eller BOB (Beskyttet Oprindelses Betegnelse). Det betyder, at en Danbo-ost fremover skal være fremstillet i Danmark efter nogle bestemte retningslinjer og leve op til en særlig kvalitet for at kunne kaldes en Danbo – og dermed få et BGB-mærke på emballagen.

Dairy Sector Continues To Grow Emerging Market Footprint

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Dairy industry leaders at the World Dairy Summit in Belfast highlighted the continued impressive growth of the dairy sector in emerging markets across the world.

Speaking at the Summit in Belfast, industry leaders provided a clear indication that the future for dairy is bright in emerging markets, particularly in Asia, Africa and Latin America.

The economic dynamism of East Asia continues to present an enormous growth opportunity for the global dairy sector.

Michael Hanley, Group Chief Executive, Lakeland Dairies – which operate both sides of the Irish border – said: “A substantial proportion of our revenues are generated from exports with over 200 of our products being exported to over 80 countries. A host of opportunities exist for dairy businesses in global emerging markets.”

“By 2050, three out of four people will either live in Africa of Asia. It is vital for dairy businesses in developed markets to invest time and resources in building a presence to ensure dairy remains an integral part of consumers’ diets in these markets.”

Dairy industry pushing forward to commercialise science and drive innovation

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The dairy industry is at the vanguard of commercialising research and development initiatives that will drive innovation, delegates at the International Dairy Federation (IDF) World Dairy Summit in Belfast were told.

In a session chaired by Dr Jeremy Hill, Chief Science and Technology Officer of Fonterra, experts in the field of research and development in the dairy sector provided insight into how scientific breakthroughs will drive innovation and help define the industry’s vision for the future.

Dr Margrethe Jonkman, Corporate Director of Research and Development at FrieslandCampina, said: “Innovation is fundamental to the ongoing success of our industry and ensuring that dairy remains relevant in the long term. The current focus on sustainability must continue if the sector is to reduce its environmental footprint. More than ever, it is vitally important that innovation adds value not only to the producer but also to the consumer.”

Arla at the IDF World Dairy Summit on Brexit

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Tomas_PietrangeliAt the IDF World Dairy Summit taking place in Belfast this week, Tomas Pietrangeli, Managing Director of Arla Foods UK has spoken on the opportunities and challenges posed by Brexit to the UK dairy industry.

In a speech given to the global dairy community Pietrangeli said. “The farmers that own Arla and the dairy industry as a whole need to know urgently what the government plans look like for the future of food and farming. That means the early publication of a new agriculture policy next year. Any delays will be detrimental to our industry due our long term planning cycles.”

Pietrangeli suggested that the post-Brexit trade deal is likely to be a complex part of the negotiation, noting that the two year status quo to avoid a cliff edge is reassuring but it’s not quite enough to plan well.

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