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Tagg: cheese

The Cheese Ingredients Market Grows

The Global Cheese Ingredients Market was worth USD 80.79 billion in 2016 and is estimated to be growing at a CAGR of 3.1%, to reach USD 94.11 billion by 2021. The market is showcasing enormous potential in the mentioned forecasting period.

The demand for cheese as a key ingredient in various cuisines is rising globally. Factors such as the rapidly increasing size of the global fast food industry are expected to increase the demand for cheese ingredients. The demand for ingredients used in natural cheese market is majorly driven by the benefits it offers, such as, it is rich in proteins, minerals, vitamins, enzymes, and healthy bacteria (probiotics).

The demand for ingredients used for natural cheese production is driven by rising customer awareness about the health benefits associated with it. The major factors restraining the growth of the market are the unfavourable regulatory conditions such as the ban on the use of milk powder or condensed milk in cheese manufacturing in Italy, and the ban imposed by the U.S. FDA on the production and sale of artisanal cheeses is expected to hinder the market growth.

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Report on Counterfeiting and Piracy in the European Union Includs Dairy

This situation report prepared by the EUIPO and Europol once again puts the spotlight on the importance of tackling the international criminals who are among the principle beneficiaries of IPR infringements in the European Union.

In 2015, the food industry saw a growth in the abuse of ‘organic’ labels attached to products
that did not comply with the organic certification but had higher retail prices, and a growth in
the misuse of such labels in the future was anticipated.

The value of falsely labelled geographical indication infringing products in the EU remains
high, with the main producers of the original products, such as Germany, Spain, France, Italy
and Greece, being the most affected by counterfeit labelled comestibles. The products affected included wine, other spirits, cheese, meat, fruit, vegetables and cereals.

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Verdict: Purely plant-based products cannot be marketed with designations such as ‘milk’, ‘cream’, ‘butter’, ‘cheese’ or ‘yoghurt’, which are reserved by EU law for animal products

Court of Justice of the European Union’s verdict: Purely plant-based products cannot, in principle, be marketed with designations such as ‘milk’, ‘cream’, ‘butter’, ‘cheese’ or ‘yoghurt’, which are reserved by EU law for animal products.

In the judgment, the Court observes that, in principle, for the purposes of the marketing and advertising in question, the relevant legislation reserves the term ‘milk’ only for milk of animal origin. In addition, except where expressly provided, that legislation reserves designations like ‘cream’, ‘chantilly’, ‘butter’, ‘cheese’ and ‘yoghurt’ solely for milk products, that is products derived from milk.

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US study: Consumption of Unpasteurized Cow’s Milk and Cheese Caused Nearly All Illness

The growing popularity of unpasteurized milk in the United States raises public health concerns.

Unpasteurized milk, consumed by only 3.2% of the population, and cheese, consumed by only 1.6% of the population, caused 96% of illnesses caused by contaminated dairy products. Unpasteurized dairy products thus cause 840 times more illnesses and 45 times more hospitalizations than pasteurized products.

As consumption of unpasteurized dairy products grows, illnesses will increase steadily; a doubling in the consumption of unpasteurized milk or cheese could increase outbreak-related illnesses by 96%.

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Study: Eating lots of cheese does not raise cholesterol

Irish people who eat a lot of cheese do not have higher cholesterol levels than those who don’t, according to research carried out at University College Dublin by Emma Feeney.

The findings of the new study indicate that those who eat large amounts of cheese consume higher amounts of saturated fats. However, the researchers did not find that eating large amounts of cheese led to increased blood LDL cholesterol levels.

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Study: 3D printing of processed cheese

A recent study in the Journal of Food Engineering explores how 3D printing affects the structure of processed cheese. How gross would 3D-printed Velveeta nachos be? A bevy of researchers from University College Cork in Ireland decided to find out.

They melted a commercially available processed cheese (think American cheese, not cheddar) and put it through a modified 3D printer that printed the cheese out at either a fast or a slow speed. The cheese was printed out into cylinders that were then cooled for 30 minutes and put in the refrigerator for a day. After that 24-hour refrigeration period, the researchers took the cheese out of the fridge to check its texture and chemical structure.

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Report:”World: Cheese – Market Report – Analysis And Forecast To 2025″

The global trade in cheese and curd amounted to 26,811 million USD in 2015, showing notable fluctuations over the period under review. A significant drop in 2009 was followed by recovery over the next two years, until exports slightly decreased again. Overall, there was an annual increase of +2.4% from 2007 to 2015.

According to estimates, Germany continued to dominate in the global supplies of cheese and curd. In 2015, Germany’s cheese and curd exports totaled 3,753 million USD, which accounted for a 14% share of global exports. Netherlands, France, Italy, and USA were the other key global suppliers of cheese and curd in 2015, with a 40% combined share of global exports.
USA (+17% per year) and Italy (+3.9% per year) were the fastest growing exporters from 2007 to 2015. 

The USA strengthened its position in the global export structure, growing its share from 2% in 2007 to 5% in 2015.
On the other hand, Germany (14%, based on value terms), the UK (7%), Italy (7%), France (6%), and USA (5%) were the leading destinations of cheese and curd imports in 2015. Imports to France grew at a quick pace of +3.8% per year from 2007 to 2015. By contrast, Italy slightly contracted its imports of cheese and curd over the same period. Every major importer saw a contraction in its share of imports over the period under review.

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Listeria in cheese; recalls by Sargento, Meijer, others

Routine, random testing by Tennessee food inspectors found Listeria monocytogenes in colby cheese and has triggered recalls of a variety of Sargento, Meijer and Amish Classics cheese products.

No illnesses had been reported to Tennessee officials or Michigan-based grocery chain Meijer, according to a state alert and a recall notice posted Thursday and Friday, respectively. However, it can take up to 70 days for symptoms of Listeria infection to develop following exposure to the bacteria.

“Listeria monocytogenes is unlike many other germs because it can grow in a cold environment,” according to the Tennessee alert. “Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women and may be fatal for individuals with weakened immune systems.”

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Cheese is the most disgusted food

Although cheese is considered edible by most people, it can also be perceived as particularly disgusting to some individuals. As such, the perception of cheese constitutes a good model to study the cerebral processes of food disgust and aversion. 

In this study, the researchers show that a higher percentage of people are disgusted by cheese than by other types of food.

To assess whether disgust for cheese is widespread among individuals, the researchers performed a survey of the French population. It revealed that among the individuals showing disgust for a given food, those disliking cheese represented a higher proportion  than those disliking the other food categories. This finding is rather surprising because France is the country with the greatest variety of cheeses and one of the countries with the highest levels of cheese consumption. It suggests that similar results might be observed in other countries with similarly high levels of cheese consumption, such as western European countries and the United States.

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